Map Shapes

There are a lot of factors that needs to be considered in texture mapping. This section will discuss the different type of map shapes that could be used along with the texture, discuss anti-aliasing problems and perspective correctness.

Map Shapes

The different map shapes that could be used are:

  1. Planar
  2. Sphere
  3.  Cylindrical

Before beginning to describe each map shapes, let us first define the different co-ordinate system for each Figure 4.

Different Coordinates System

Figure 4: Illustrates the different co-ordinate system

In the following paragraph, there will be an explanation of each of this map shapes in relation to the object that it will be mapped on. To begin with, take a look at the use of planar map.

Planar map shapes only considers two coordinates of the objects X,Y,Z components [10]. For example, take a look at Figure 5 which illustrates the application of this shape considering only the X and Y co-ordinates.

An illustration of planar shape maps in action

Figure 5: Taken from Wolfe’s "Teaching Texture Visually". This illustrates the use of planar map shapes.

Sphere map shapes converts the point (X,Y,Z) to (r,theta,phi) Spherical coordinates. For texture mapping purposes, only the theta(longitude) and phi(latitude) values are considered. When finding the colour of the texture map, the longitude is converted to x and latitude to y.  Take a look at Figure 7 to see the application of this.

An illustration of Spherical map in action

Figure 7: This illustrates the use of sphere map to a teapot object and the results of this application to other objects. Taken from Wolfe's paper "Teaching Texture Visually"

Cylindrical map shapes converts the point (X,Y,Z) to (p, phi and z) (cylindrical coordinates). For texture mapping purposes, only the phi and z value are considered. [10] Take a look at [Figure 5 Taken from Wolfe’s Teaching Texture Visually [10]] of which illustrates the application of this on a teapot.

An illustration of cylinderical map in action

Figure 6: This illustrates the use of cylinderical map to a teapot object and the results of this application to other objects. Taken from Wolfe's paper "Teaching Texture Visually"

Next Anti-Aliasing and MipMapping…

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  • Declarion of own work

    I declare that this work is my own Author Roldan Fritz Tagaro, contact me for more information at: acb08rt@shef.ac.uk
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